Perceived Stress and Stressors among Medical and Dental Students of Bhairhawa, Nepal: A Descriptive Cross-sectional Study

  • Harleen Bali Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Kathmandu University School of Medical Sciences, Dhulikhel, Kathmandu, Nepal.
  • Vaibhav Rai Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Universal College of Medical Sciences-College of Dental Surgery, Bhairhawa, Nepal.
  • Nitin Khanduri Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Seema Dental College and Hospital, Rishikesh, Uttrakhand, India.
  • Rupam Tripathi Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Universal College of Medical Sciences-College of Dental Surgery, Bhairhawa, Nepal.
  • Khushbu Adhikari Department of Periodontology and Oral Implantology, B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal.
  • Binam Sapkota Department of Prosthodontics, Kathmandu University School of Medical Sciences, Dhulikhel, Kathmandu, Nepal.
Keywords: Academic Performance, Developing Countries, Medical School, Mental Health, Stress

Abstract

Introduction: Medical school is recognized as a stressful environment that may have a negative
effect on a student’s academic performance, health, and psychosocial well-being. This could further
impact future health professionals’ attitudes and compromise patients’ care. This study aims to find
out various sources of stress for medical and dental students to help prevent many future health
problems in a student’s life.


Methods: It was a cross-sectional study done in Universal College of Medical Sciences, Bhairhawa,
Nepal, among undergraduate final year bachelor of medicine and bachelor of surgery and third and
fourth year (phase I and phase II) dental students, using a questionnaire with Likert’s scale. Data
obtained was tabulated and analyzed using analysis of variance.


Results: Results showed that stress during exam 210 (92.9%) and preparation phase 200 (88.5%) stood
out as the maximum stressors for our study group. The least stress-causing element was recorded as
terms with seniors 45 (19.9%), adjustment with roommates 52 (23.01%), and competing with peers
69 (30.53%). Length of course 187 (82.74%), understanding the course 173 (76.55%), reading several
textbooks 171 (75.66%), and work overload 165 (73.01%) amounted to significant stressors.


Conclusions: Stress has a detrimental effect both on health as well as academic performance. The
stressors at the campus should be identified and proper coping assistance should be provided to
individual students. Systemic efforts are needed to address their concerns and make mental health
care easily accessible to them. Counseling and awareness are recommended.

Published
2020-06-30
How to Cite
Bali, H., Rai, V., Khanduri, N., Tripathi, R., Adhikari, K., & Sapkota, B. (2020). Perceived Stress and Stressors among Medical and Dental Students of Bhairhawa, Nepal: A Descriptive Cross-sectional Study. Journal of Nepal Medical Association, 58(226). https://doi.org/10.31729/jnma.4911